Monday, April 6, 2009

The Faces of the Sloss Furnaces Iron Pour



Well after all was said and done, I got to spend two days at Sloss Furnaces enjoying the incredible activities with the National Conference on Cast Iron Art going on there.  If you missed my first post on Friday,  here it is.  Well my friend Elise took me back on Saturday to see more.  I have so many photos I suppose I'll put them on a Flickr slideshow. We'll see if I can figure that out.  For today, some mighty cool strangers I got to have a chat or just a few words with. Enjoy! 

33 comments:

Olivier said...

encore une belle série de portraits, bravo
still a beautiful series of portraits, bravo

Tash said...

Next to your children portraits & the shoemaker, these are your very best! The 1st one is just wonderful & so is the one with the two young women. What a fascinating art form to observe.

Bibi said...

Lovely portraits, Virginia! I especially like the last one; she's got a bit of Belgrade Red in her wisp of hair!

Laurie said...

Virg, you are so masterful at capturing people! These are just wonderful, and so full of life.

FireLight said...

Isn't it wonderful that such young people are interested in this craft that literally built a city? I know they may be going in totally new and different directions with their skills, but I love the connection of generations.

Virginia said...

I was amazed at how young they all were. They were extremely focused on their craft. There was little time to converse with most of them so I chose not to label this 100 Strangers although several will make it there.
The girl at the bottom had HOT PINK hair to match those cute goggles, Bibi! ha She held her own with the guys on her team. I was a great event.

Rambling Round said...

The face in the second photo was at the Selma Pilgrimage Iron Pour at The Foundry. These iron casters really have to dress in some heavy work clothes!

Thérèse said...

Such an art! One more thing to demistify (cast iron art.)

alice said...

Bonjour Virginia! Sorry for not having been here these last days but I enjoyed the last days of vacation of my daughter, the weather was fine so we've been outside most of the time! Now, she's back to Germany... Sigh.
Interesting and various posts here, with beautiful portraits, we are spoiled.
A bientôt!

alice said...

Love their suede jackets, I want the same!

Mark said...

What a great photo op!
I can't wait to see the rest of the images on Flickr or wherever you happen to post them. Please let us know!

Virginia said...

Alice,
Glad you got to spend time with your daughter!!

The suede leggings, aprons and jackets were interesting. Some even wore shiny metallic suits!! The top photo caught my eye because if the color. Many had decorated their jackets with elaborate artwork. I might run a set on these later on in the month.

James said...

Great work. The second guy kind of reminds me of myself 25yrs ago. Well at least the hair and T-shirt.

Halcyon said...

Nice portraits!

Daryl said...

Wonderful portraits all

Ken Mac said...

when I saw the word "pour" I thought for sure you meant booze...oh well..

Kelly said...

I really enjoyed these portraits. It looks like a really interesting process.

cieldequimper said...

Superb portraits!

marley said...

Great collection of photos, nice record od the event. I like all of the protective gear!

Nathalie said...

Your top photo would have qualified for Yellow theme day. Great portrait!

Julie said...

There is a wonderful intensity in the connection between head and hand in the second image, Virginia, which I like very much.

Virginia said...

Julie, Merci for the assist there. I hope to be back on my "game" tomorrow! :)

KM,
I suspect there was some of that going on as well!!!

James,
So you had some dreadlocks huh? Cool!

Mark,
FLickr trouble signing in. I'll let you know if I can break the code and actually load the photos. Thanks!

altadenahiker said...

You find the most amazing places. (Love the last picture.)

Babooshka said...

I'm with Ken Mac on what pour me to me. I am very connected to these images. My dad once worked in a foundry magnesium casting. Dangerous stuff. He burnt his eye once on the day he gave up smoking. Eyes all banadges up,in the ambulance, what record came on the radio... I can see clearly now the rain has gone. Poeple V, stick with people. You connect with them, the camera just captures it, you make the shot.

Julie said...

What about "After the Concert"? What about the Palm Sunday cross? What about the lemons on the tray? She has an artistic heart for a range of genres, IMHO.

Babooshka said...

I disagree with you about these being sloppy as you commented. It's all to do with the faces, so natural that I was concentrating on. You captured for me, who does this day in day out for a living, a lost art that is dying in photography - the human aspect. Not an airbrush or fake stance in sight. I have to take so many posed people images work wise( well it pays the bills of course) that it's always refreshing to peruse the dailies for such genuine images. I am getting heartily sick of commenting and words being taken out of context, especially as I never criticise another's work.You may have noticed my absence over several days and missing the odd post. You know me well enough to know by now I do not damn with feint praise but enthuse and guide when asked to do so, and only when asked. To admonish publically is otherwise is just plain rude. You click with people, and it is rare. Olivier, Bibi and Eki are also in this camp. Laurie is a cinematic photographer, Snapper a mononchrome supremo. Why in my not so humble opinion I have warranted comments that choose to misrepresent me I don't know. Afterall I am the joker in the pack and have always dealt a kind light hearted word,a fun poke at myslef. Life is too short for bitter lemons when Jack Daniels is on the menu.

PJ said...

Intensity is what comes to mind here. I've done construction work and when it's just you and your tools, well, it's very satisfying. It's also dangerous so the focus is very necessary, especially with this kind of work where there's no room for error.

Virginia said...

Thanks B,
I look forward to your comments, guidance and above all good humor with us all. Glad you liked them. There might be a few more to come here. It was an interesting two days for me. I was not exactly in my element but i loved it!!!
V

PJ,
Yes, they were intense and it was something to witness.

Kim said...

V. These are each wonderful. The guy in the second shot looks just like my husband when he would be working. I love when you show us artists and craftspeople at work. These are a treat to see.
Since you felt a bit out of your element in this setting, I wonder, did it affect how you saw and shot things? What I like about your foundry shots is the deep connection with B'ham history (going clear back to it's namesake' heritage in England) and the lively art scene that is going on now.
-Kim

PJ said...

Kim, I had the same thought. It helps if you know how something is done so you can anticipate the action. Virginia, you'll feel more comfortable the next time, especially if you go and just watch for a while, get to see how the motions made. Then it will seem very familiar. These faces are just radiant, you bring out the best in people, that's a fact.

VW reaviere

Virginia said...

This blog has pushed me so far "out of my element" I can't even tell it all. This was a wonderful experience. I didn't know what to expect but I'm have an artist's heart, although I don't always act on it. I have two dear dear friends who were metal scuptors here at Sloss for many years as Artists in Residence. I wished for them many times over the weekend.I would love to photograph something like this again. Next time... I"m staying till it gets dark and I can capture the fabulous shots my friend Bill Dixon got. WOW!

Dusty Lens said...

Molten iron is serious art. Cool venue to capture.

Maya said...

As usual your people shots are out of sight! That first one is exceptional.